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20110722
20110722
Search Results 0 to 11 of about 12 (some duplicates have been removed)
pakistan describes the move against an american citizen arrested in the u.s. this week and accused of working for pakistan. this is the latest in a rapidly deteriorating relationship which was highlighted when the u.s. killed osama bin laden and pakistan. the prime minister is currently in london. my colleague asked if he understood why the u.s. had not told pakistan. >> that is the thing we did not like. >> you understand why? >> they did not want to share their victory with pakistan, they only want to share defeat. >> what they're indicating is that they did not trust the military and your security services to not leak it. >> when we had intelligence sharing with them and the people, the most wanted terrorist of al qaeda, we helped them. there was no reason not to share with us. >> did the isi note that osama bin laden was less than a mile away from your defense academy? >> he had been there for a long time. i want to ask you one question, whether the world intelligence failed? the whole failure of the world. >> did you know that bin laden was there? did your intelligence service
on g.m.t., we bring you pakistan's new jazz-playing orchestra. also a one-time presidential challenger. questioning him on bribery allegations. the heatwave across the central and eastern parts of the united states is being blamed for causing more than 20 deaths. the temperatures rising to 43 degrees centigrade. further deaths are forecasted with predictions temperatures will not fall until sunday at the earliest. >> a sweltering heat we have a is spreading across the united states, and millions are struggling to stay cool. punishing conditions have spread from southern areas to the east coast. >> tonight on world news, the hidden dangers. >> the heat is making american headlines. the national weather service has issued warnings to areas affecting for man half the population. despite thi soaring temperatures have the tragic consequences. >> in my secure they, two women died in their 70's and 30 peep have died. in big cities, cooling centers have been set up to provide emergency relief. >> i sat outside a few minutes ago, and already i'm extremely uncomfortable. a huge open-air sauna, a
. pakistan? where would you focus your attention? >> pakistan's an important challenge. there's not much we can do about it. we've tried all sorts of things there and nothing seems to work. i would say revitalizing our relationships in asia and the pacific. that's where history the going to be written in the 21st surgeriry. i would say involved there. better relations with ind ka ya with the countries of southeast asia. doing something about our energy situation that we're less vulnerable on vagaries of price and supply that would go a long way. again, i'd focus more at home on competitiveness, on improving our immigration policy. on the quality of our schools. on the quality of our transportation infrastructure and so forth. again, we have got to retore the foundations of american power. that's a prerequisite if we're going to lead in the world either by what we do or our example. >> restoration is the theme. i hope it's the subject of the next book. thanks so much for joining us. >> thanks, andrea. >> it's very provocative richard. >>> a word of warning the images you're about to see is h
of these people, especially in scandinavia have gone to somalia, gone to pakistan, afghanistan, linked up with various jihadist groups, some of them have been trained in bomb making, assassinations, and they've come back. and if there's one thing that worries authorities across the world it's those people who are residents of europe, who have gone overseas and have come back trained and ready to give their lives or to create mayhem. >> how will they go about trying to find out who it is? what will they be looking for right now on the scene? >> one thing we know is that the intelligence agencies have been on the high state of alert for the last nine months. now they're going to pour much more resources into that. who's involved, which mosques may have been basis for militancy, for example. they'll want to find as much forensic evidence from the bomb, its packaging, maybe a vehicle identification number, cttv from the area, all of that will come into place straight away. the most important thing they get is the signature of the bomb or what was -- what it was in, what was carrying it, was i
talks, and talk to journalist pam constable about her new book on pakistan. i'm judy woodruff. >> lehrer: and i'm jim lehrer. "washington week" can be seen later this evening on most pbs stations. we'll see you online, and again here monday evening. have a nice weekend. thank you and good night. major funding for the pbs newshour has been provided by: chevron. we may have more in common than you think. >> and by the bill and melinda gates foundation. dedicated to the idea that all people deserve the chance to live a healthy, productive life. >> and with the ongoing support of these institutions and foundations. and... this program was made possible by the corporation for public broadcasting. and by contributions to your pbs station from viewers like you. thank you. captioning sponsored by macneil/lehrer productions captioned by media access group at wgbh access.wgbh.org >> this is "bbc world news america." funding for this presentation is made possible by the freeman foundation of new york, stowe, vermont, and honolulu. newman's own foundation. and union bank. ♪ >> union bank has put i
at the indian subcontinent, the population is 1.4 billion, same as china, which includes bangladesh and pakistan of it. it's a lot of people in a small area, but they're running out of water, particularly in india. they're overpumping their aquefers, their wells are running dry. and they're projected to grow by 1 million people in the years ahead. subsaharan africa has morelan l, but its population is growing very fast, and it doesn't have the resources to develop the productivity of the land fully. so that's the problem there. and the hunger and malnutrition in the world is concentrated in the indian subcontinent and subsaharan africa. >> do you think the rest of the world -- there's been a big call from the u.n. to say, we need to help these people. is there help available in the rest of the world with the economy teetering the way it is? a lot of countries saying we'd like to help. but we just can't. >> if it's just the horn of africa, 10 million people, 12 million people, that's large. if it becomes bigger and affects a number of countries, then it would be scramble time. the question is how
to al qaeda, possibly al qaeda in pakistan. these investigations have been ongoing. what is not clear is whether there's any relation of this attack today, brooke. >> how should the world community react to this? how should security change in oslo? >> well, to try and prevent this from happening again. until we understand who is actually responsible for this, obviously it's early to talk about responses. burr if it is indeed al qaeda, then greater steps against al qaeda will need to be taken. they have a safe haven right now in pakistan where they're still able to train operatives, including norwegian residents. and arrested last year in norway and suspected of being involved in a plot over there. so the response if it is al qaeda will have to increase, brooke. >> right. and then again, no one has thus far come forward claiming responsibility, but it does have the makings, as you mentioned, of that terrorist organization. thank you very much. >>> coming up next, we'll speak with someone on the ground in oslo on the exact same street where that explosion happened. he says his office fe
into the gulf of oman, towards pakistan. it is very important. these two monarchies have done everything possible to crush any sign or effort of reform or agitation for reform. in the case of the saudi arabia, there were quite successful in doing this. some of the liberal saudis tried to have a so-called day of raids on march 11. -- a so-called day of rage on march 11. exactly one person showed up in riyadh. that person was swamped by journalists. but 17,000 people had signed up on the facebook page to come out and participate in the day of rage. some shiites in the eastern province show that the day before and had their demonstration. but, basically, the saudis have been able to mobilize not only the threat of security forces cracking down on anybody who demonstrates, the got the religious establishment making any kind of demonstrations religiously forbidden. they put pressure on families to keep their kids at home. and they succeeded. in the case of bahrain, it was much more messy, and you have a shiite majority there of 70% may become a 65% to 75%. and they were on their way to probab
, israel, indonesia and pakistan. interestingly enough, 75% of people in egypt said arabs not responsible for 9/11. >> should we cue up some bin laden tapes where he's admitting the entire thing or khali shaikh mohammed talking about how the plot was put together or the video confessions of those suicide -- of the suicide terrorists before they died? i mean, would that help? that's not even a tough question. >> it isn't a tough question. >> yet the disconnect continues to be there. we always hear that, it makes no sense obviously to us here. meanwhile, let's get to your headlines. >> we will indeed. defense lawyers plan to present an insanity defense today in the arkansas murder trial of abdul akim muhammad accused of killing one soldier and wounding another outside an army recruiting station in little rock. muhammad insists he's not insane and claims his actions were justified by the quran. >> a texas man who was kidnapped has been found dead in mexico. police say he was murdered after his family could not pay a $10,000 ransom. he worked as a federal court interpreter in el paso and was
in pakistan just an hour away from islama bad. they raided the congresswoman pound. and in the burst of gun fire, the al qaeda leader was killed and his body buried at sea. as america celebrated and the world wondered about retaliation . >> we should remember in particular the brave servicemen and women who gave their lives against terrorism across the world and pay tribute to the british forces who played their part over the last decade in the hunt for bin laden. he was responsible for 9/11. which was not only a horrific killing of americans but remains to this day the largest loss of british life in any terrorist attack. as a head of a family group of flight 93 put it, we are willing to make an exception in this case. he was evil personified and our world is a better place without him. >> while understanding the satisfaction and elation of those who lost family members on 9/11, my friend agrees that the sober reality is that some things are unchanged by the death of osama bin laden. the threat remains and jihad must be confronted and adequate resources, effective international cooperation
Search Results 0 to 11 of about 12 (some duplicates have been removed)

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